March302014

Anonymous asked: What is esla

Electrostatic Lifting Apparatus

Used for lifting footmarks off hard surfaces. 

March42014

Anonymous asked: how can livor mortis be used in estimatin time of death

Why, do you have homework? :)

Try looking at chapter one of this book. There are also loads of resources you can find just by googling ‘livor mortis time of death’. 

February62014

hetahomestuckgirl asked: I was thinking about going into Forensic Science. I really don't know how to start or anything. I am fifteen and I want to start learning now.

Ok, good for you! It’s a great career. Was there something specific you wanted to know?

January222014
December282013

sexy-sluts-forever asked: Right now I am a Natural Science major with a specialization in Forensic Science and a minor in Psychology. However, this college does not seem to be benefiting me. No kind of internships, or any kind of help in the forensic field besides a couple of basic classes. My goal in life career wise is to become a CSI or work for the FBI at some point. I was thinking of changing my major to Psychology and a minor in Forensic Science, or change schools completely where i major in Forensic Science ...

continued….I was thinking of changing my major to Psychology and a minor in Forensic Science, or change schools completely where i major in Forensic Science and not Natural Science. I cannot obtain a handle on all of the Biology and Chemistry. I’m very lost lately, any help is much appreciated.

Ok! I’m not sure how much help I can be because of the differences between the UK and US, but I will try.

Over here it’s very hard to get work experience with any forensic organisations due to confidentiality issues and when my friend and I looked for one independently of our university, we were turned down by them all. We found it was much better to look for something in a related discipline - in the end we both went to an environmental science lab and were fortunate to be able to have a tour of their forensic facilities while we were there. If you can get some experience in at a lab, it will still be valuable even if it is not forensic in nature.

I also did single honours so I have no real experience of studying more than one subject, but due to the nature of it, you are going to get less forensic classes because of having to fit in the other things as well (or at least that is the way I believe it works here). 

I’m afraid I don’t know what kinds of qualifications or skills you need to work for the FBI, but I know a few people who applied for jobs as Scenes of Crime Officers after completing the same course that I did (in pure forensic science) and I think that, if I remember back correctly to the career advice I had before I started my own university course, a course in pure forensics might serve you better. BUT I don’t know the specifics of it in the States, and of course your own competence and skills will count as well as the course you have done.

The biology and chemistry is important to forensic science in gaining an understanding of the methods and concepts involves, although this might be less important if you want to do purely bagging and tagging at scenes. Does your school offer experience of crime scenes at all? We had to attend several mocked up (but very realistic) scenes, and this is how I found out that I in no way want to do any CSI work, for reasons that are too long to go into here! 

All that considered, I think my ultimate advice would be to look at your own course and other courses carefully as well as to ask for career advice from people who have been there and done it. I think all of my own course tutors had experience of being in some kind of forensic job, so they were ideal to talk to about how to get where I want to be. I wouldn’t necessarily recommend the general university careers advice service (assuming your uni has one), as forensics is quite a highly specialised area. 

Don’t forget as well that your career aspirations might change as you study. When I started uni I wanted to do SOCO work, then changed my mind to mortuary work for a while, and now I am studying to become a forensic entomologist. You could also look at finding out which areas of forensics have available jobs in the US. For example, is it easy to find work as a CSI, or are there more jobs in lab work etc? That might guide you a little.

I hope some of that was at least a little bit helpful!

October132013

Anonymous asked: Hi, I wondered whether you knew any casework examples of superglue fuming being used. I have to do it for an assignment, and I've been trawling the internet trying to find forensic cases where they specifically used superglue fuming and I can't find anything. I'm thought I found one about the 'Dockland bomb' in the UK but I can't find anything on it. I was wondering whether you knew any.

I couldn’t think of any off the top of my head but I’ve found one that looks useful in the Journal of Forensic Sciences which involves visualising prints on a shell casing from a murder scene. 

June72013
8PM

BREAKING NEWS

fuckyeahforensics:

Richard Ramierez, the Night Stalker, has died in prison.

More to come

May282013
booksandbookporn:

Beyond The Body Farm by Dr Bill Bass and Jon Jefferson
Synopsis: A pioneer in forensic anthropology, Dr Bill Bass created the world’s first laboratory dedicated to the study of human decomposition; three acres of land where human bodies are exposed to the elements. His research at the ‘Body Farm’ has revolutionised forensic science, helping to crack cold cases and pinpoint time of death.
During a career that spans half a century, Bass and his work have ranged far beyond the gates of the Body Farm. Such as reassembling - from battered torsos and a stack of severed limbs - eleven people hurled skyward by an explosion at an illegal fireworks factory, and extracting DNA from a long-buried corpse, only to find that the female murder victim may have been mistakenly identified twenty-five years before. 
In Beyond The Body Farm, Dr Bill Bass explored the rise of modern forensic science, using fascinating cases from his career to take readers into the real world of C.S.I.
Opinion: This is a really interesting book which covers many different aspects of modern forensic science - such as anthropology, entomology, DNA technology and forensic art - in a series of anecdotal examples from Bass’ career. The variety in the book is good; the cases range from murder to plane crashes to explosions to more archaeological cases involving ancient remains. There is also a glossary of anthropology and forensic terms, including anthropological diagrams, for those who may be less familiar with the terminology. The cases are accompanied by photographs and other case materials which really help to enhance the anecdotes. I really enjoyed the personal style of the writing and the high level of detail and forensic accuracy throughout.
Rating: ★ ★ ★ ★ ★
Synopsis taken from book cover. Image from waterstones.com

booksandbookporn:

Beyond The Body Farm by Dr Bill Bass and Jon Jefferson

Synopsis: A pioneer in forensic anthropology, Dr Bill Bass created the world’s first laboratory dedicated to the study of human decomposition; three acres of land where human bodies are exposed to the elements. His research at the ‘Body Farm’ has revolutionised forensic science, helping to crack cold cases and pinpoint time of death.

During a career that spans half a century, Bass and his work have ranged far beyond the gates of the Body Farm. Such as reassembling - from battered torsos and a stack of severed limbs - eleven people hurled skyward by an explosion at an illegal fireworks factory, and extracting DNA from a long-buried corpse, only to find that the female murder victim may have been mistakenly identified twenty-five years before. 

In Beyond The Body Farm, Dr Bill Bass explored the rise of modern forensic science, using fascinating cases from his career to take readers into the real world of C.S.I.

Opinion: This is a really interesting book which covers many different aspects of modern forensic science - such as anthropology, entomology, DNA technology and forensic art - in a series of anecdotal examples from Bass’ career. The variety in the book is good; the cases range from murder to plane crashes to explosions to more archaeological cases involving ancient remains. There is also a glossary of anthropology and forensic terms, including anthropological diagrams, for those who may be less familiar with the terminology. The cases are accompanied by photographs and other case materials which really help to enhance the anecdotes. I really enjoyed the personal style of the writing and the high level of detail and forensic accuracy throughout.

Rating: ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

Synopsis taken from book cover. Image from waterstones.com

May132013

Insect fact of the day

The blowfly Chrysomya albiceps is a facultative predator, meaning that they will predate on other blowfly larvae if given the chance.

Because of this, care needs to be taken when determining postmortem interval in cases where C. albiceps have been found on the body in case they have arrived later than other species but have killed off their competitors.

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